Ulster Transport Museum

Taken for a Ride

Throughout the 1800s, the horse and carriage became not merely a means of conveyance, but an expression of wealth, authority and social etiquette, and these vehicles are still considered the epitome of style and elegance.

Permanent display

Exit Menu

Throughout the 1800s, the horse and carriage became not merely a means of conveyance, but an expression of wealth, authority and social etiquette, and these vehicles are still considered the epitome of style and elegance. The vehicles on display in the Taken for a Ride (Carriage) Gallery cover a broad range, from the humble market cart to the state carriage used for the most formal of occasions.

Highlights of this exhibition include:

State Landau

Our landau carriage was built by the Royal Victoria Carriage Bazaar. It was used by the High Sheriff to convey judges from their lodgings to the opening of the County Antrim Assizes (periodic court).

Brougham

The first Brougham was built in 1839 for Lord Brougham as a small carriage for town use. Broughams became popular, and second-hand broughams were often used as hackney cabs. To attract the driver’s attention, passengers pulled a cord that ran from inside the carriage to a hook on his belt.

Mail Phaeton

Mail phaetons were generally driven by gentlemen, for exercising and training horses and for long journeys that required changes of horses. Our mail phaeton was built by Peters & Sons, an important builder of fine quality vehicles, whose customers included the Royal family.